IWD thread: an update

7 Apr

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

For those who read this thread, I offer an apology.

It’s very difficult for me, given current events, to find motivation to continue talking about the need for everyone–including women–to see everyone else–particularly women, both cis and trans, and gender fluid/gender queer people–as equals.

The current administration has declared April to be “Sexual Assault Awareness Month.”

Irony has died.

Continue reading

Oooopsss — status report chez aztec

5 Apr

Just a quick note: a number of posts that I thought I had scheduled to post over the past month and a half never posted–because aztec didn’t pay attention, and saved them all as drafts.

Most of them belong to the International Women’s Day thread/page, and a couple of reviews, so they will be back dated to when I originally had intended them to post. I apologize in advance, particularly if you subscribe to email notifications and get a bunch of them today.

On other news: I caved to peer pressure and am now on twitter, @herhandsmyhands.

Women’s pain, again.

21 Mar

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

I have linked to some stuff on the incredible gender bias in healthcare before.

Here’s a recent BuzzFeed piece, with 29 accounts of specific cases in which women’s health concerns and pain were dismissed out of hand–and some of the indelible, lifelong negative consequences of said dismissal.

This is not new, and while it’s more prevalent among male health providers, even female doctors and nurse practitioners have been indoctrinated into dismissing female pain as exaggerated. We are expected to soldier on, regardless, and we often do, because we also, often, have no choice.

But the fact that we take it doesn’t alleviate the responsibility of those causing harm by dismissing our voices and our knowledge of our own bodies.

That didn’t take long.

16 Mar

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

And…it took barely two days after the Fearless Girl was installed, before a particularly privileged white male, to the applause of some of his friends, thought it funny to mock fuck it.

“Almost as if out of central casting, some Wall Street finance broseph appeared and started humping the statue while his gross date rape-y friends laughed and cheered him on,”

I imagine many people, particularly men, will shrug the incident off. And that the same tire platitutdes will be uttered.

Boys will be boys! They were probably drunk! It’s a harmless joke!

Considering how often real women, and young girls, are exposed to this same behaviour, and how often these assaults are dismissed with these same attitudes/excuses…yeah, call me over sensitive, but both the behaviour and all the justifications for it are, precisely, why feminism is needed.

The girl and the bull

15 Mar

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

On January 21 of this year, millions of women marched–on Washington DC, on large cities like New York or Los Angeles, and in small towns. They marched in the United States, and they marched around the world. They marched for all women, and for humanity itself.

A few weeks later, a bronze statue of a girl was set in front of the iconic bronze bull on Wall Street. Seemingly fearless, this young, unarmed female stares down a charging bull many times her size.

Immediately, praise was heaped upon the idea and what it purports to symbolize.

Here’s why it’s neither deserving of acclaim, nor representative of women:

Let’s have a little look at this statue for a minute. What we have here is a skinny little girl, normatively dressed for her assumed gender, with her hair in a ponytail. She looks very young, and she does not have anything in her hands, such as a gun, a matador’s cape, or an angry hive of bees — anything that would actually do something about a charging bull.

Her pose dramatically evokes bravery, but the statue, however well meaning, is a bunch of really stupid consciousness-raising — whereas the Day Without a Woman actually got a whole lot of women more deeply aware of the fact that what we do in the world keeps the world going, and that when we stop doing those things the world stops.

And those women and girls would not only be there for a month. Those women and girls would be there in bronze, taking that bull down forever.

How women’s participation, and their exclusion, have impacted the country’s history.

13 Mar

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

Via openculture.com, a FREE online course:

• How women’s participation in, exclusion from, and impact on American economic, political, and social life have altered American history.
• How key figures and events have challenged the role of women in the home and workplace.
• How ideas, such as democracy, citizenship, liberty, patriotism, and equality have differently shaped the lives of women and men.
• How women of different races and classes have experienced work, both inside and outside the home.
• How historians of women and gender study America’s past, including hands-on opportunities to practice analyzing primary sources from the present and the past.
• How women’s history has developed and changed over time.

It starts today, so go ahead, learn to view the world around you in a different light.

Women’s History Month

10 Mar

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

So March is Women’s History Month in the US. To celebrate it, as well as providing a striking visual of the incredibly large gender gap in publishing, a bookstore in Cleveland, OH, flipped all the books by male authors.


One of the first reactions I saw was to ask if it was ‘fair’ to obscure some authors to highlight others.

Gee, I wonder how many women authors have felt that, ever.

Soon after, someone else asked, How about women authors publishing under male pseudonyms?

Isn’t the fact that female authors still feel the need to submit manuscripts under male pseudonyms, particularly in genres like Science Fiction, further proof of the gender gap?

A while back, in the literature forum, I brought this up, and was told (in so many words) that there’s not that much of a gender gap in publishing. Wonder if that opinion still holds.