Vertical zipper pouch

13 Jul
A pouch with a box-like bottom half in denim, and a burgundy cotton fabric top bisected by a closed vertical zipper, with a strip of blue fabric running around where the two parts join, and as a binding at the top, where the handle, in the burgundy fabric, comes up.

Little reading, while also avoiding twitter as much as I can (because the world is on fire, and I am struggling to cope), means more making things. And these days, it mostly means sewing. So, here’s another image-heavy post for you.

Fair warning, I had the devil of a time trying to get a good picture of this one, because it’s shape is…Let’s go with “challenging” to photograph–for me.

Using some more of the fabric from old work shirts, old jeans, and leftover chintz fabric from oh…thirty five years ago?, I decided to try my hand at a different form factor for a pouch, with a vertical zipper and a square base.

The square bottom half, right side out, after quilting in a diamond patter with burgundy thread

As I quilted the denim with burgundy thread, the interface (aka, fabric from an old t-shirt) is red.

Shell and lining of the square bottom half, both inside out, attached to each other by the bottom side seams. This shows the red t-shirt I used as interface, attached to the denim shell through the quilting stitches.

You can see that I used a blue t-shirt as interfacing for the top half, because that way the royal blue thread used in the quilting would not stand out through the chintz.

Two pieces of chintz in blue and pink pastels, with a zipper running from top to bottom between them; visible at the bottom edge are a blue t-shirt used as interfacing and the burgundy cotton for the outer shell. On one side, the back piece that joins them into a tube can be seen.

I had to redo that part, though. Originally, I wanted to add an apliqué, just for the hell of it, so I did:

Two pieces of burgundy fabric, flat on the desk, quilted in a diamond pattern in royal blue thread. These pieces are joined by a white zipper. Centered on one of the pieces, there's a royal blue circle aplique, quilted with parallel lines with a burgundy thread. The back piece that joins these into a tube is just visible.

However, once I folded the top inwards, my folly was instantly evident.

The same tube from the previous image; now standing with folds inwards along the top, held with clips, showing how the apliquéd circle is no longer centered on the side piece; in fact, almost half of the appiqué is folded back, which looks wonky and awkward.

There was grumbling and unpicking, and grumbling and stitching, but it’s better without it, to be honest; I think that was a bit too much blue.

The denim box-like bottom half stitched to the top tubular bit, so that the zipper runs vertically. The joint is unfinished. The top of the tube is folded inwards on the sides with two clips, where it will be sewn together.

I did not quite give up entirely on using blue fabric, though.

The unfinished pouch, with the folded-inwards top seam sewn, and the zipper open so the pastel chintz lining is visible. The joint with the bottom denim box-like shape is covered with a strip of blue fabric in the same shade as the quilting thread on the top half.

The little bit of blue in the binding at the top brings it together, I feel.

A pouch with a box-like bottom half in denim, and a burgundy cotton fabric top bisected by an open vertical zipper, with a strip of blue fabric running around where the two parts join, and as a binding at the top, where the handle, in the burgundy fabric, comes up.

I like how it turned out, though I’m annoyed because I can’t seem to manage to get even one decent side photo where it doesn’t look, well, lumpy and distorted.

The finished pouch, propped up somewhat, shot from overhead, to try and show the box-like bottom and the folded top. Sadly, the image is distorted and it looks lumpy as hell.

I like the finishing on the inside, though it’s not likely it will see much light of day, as the construction makes it quite impractical to turn it inside out

Behold, the top:

The finished pouch, inside out, showing the folds on the top seam; because the zipper runs all the way to the top, it allows a glimpse of the denim out shell of the bottom part. The lining is a pastel blues and pinks chintz

The front (more or less):

The finished pouch inside out, from the front, showing the seam where the box-like bottom part joins with the vertical, zippered part. The open zipper shows a glimpse of the burgundy fabric of the outside, and a bit of the blue binding at the top. The lining is a pastels blues and pinks chintz

And the bottom:

The bottom of the pouch, inside out, showing the seams that form the box shape; the lining is a pastel blues and pinks chintz

The photographs are misleading; the finished pouch is 6in (15cm) across and 6in (15cm) top to bottom, and about 3in (8cm) front to back at the bottom.

A pouch with a box-like bottom half in denim, and a burgundy cotton fabric top bisected by a closed vertical zipper, with a strip of blue fabric running around where the two parts join, and as a binding at the top, where the handle, in the burgundy fabric, comes up.

The difference from the top (almost flat) to the wide bottom is what makes taking good photographs pretty much impossible for me.

The finished pouch, on its side, shot from overhead, to try and show the box-like bottom and the folded top. Sadly, the image is distorted and it looks lumpy as hell.

If you’ve made it this far, thank you! The rest is a couple more bad photographs using different backgrounds and lightning angles, none of which really worked, more’s the pity.

The finished pouch, on the other side, shot from overhead, to try and show the box-like bottom and the folded top. Sadly, the image is distorted and it looks lumpy as hell.
The finished pouch, standing/leaning against a beige background, with the zipper open to show a bit of the lining, looking kind of lumpy
Finished pouch, laying on a wooden desk, looking "bottom heavy" doe to paralaxing and bad lighting

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