Classic sewing machine, of sorts

10 Aug
A pincushion made in the form of a classic sewing machine, black, with metal plate, a few miniature wooden spools with real thread, on a wooden base. A button stands for the wheel, and pins stand for the needle moving parts. The angle shows better the color of the thread in the spools

I cannot take good pictures to save my life, but still want to document my crafting endeavors, so, here we are.

Side by side, on a keyboard, two pincushions shaped like classic sewing machines, one burgundy and one black

I had teased some about this earlier; I’m afraid there’s not a lot about the process of making these, except that I saw a much bigger version, made out of felt, and wondered if I could adapt it as a miniature.

A pincushion made in the form of a classic sewing machine, black, with metal plate, a few miniature wooden spools with real thread, on a wooden base. A button stands for the wheel, and pins stand for the needle moving parts

The bases they’re attached to are under 1.75in/4cm wide, and about 2.75in/7cm long, and about 1/75in/4cm tall. They are just slightly too big to be true 1:12 scale, but close.

A tiny wooden thread spool with a 1in sewing pin through, laying on a metal ruler.

I did take pains to make the wooden thread spools true 1:12 scale. I used regular toothpicks, a pin vise hand drill, and the thinnest sewing thread I could find. I absolutely adore them.

Side by side, two black sewing machine pincushions, one stuffed with a metal oval plaque, the other unstuffed, with silver/grey fabric standing for the metal plaque

I had fun trying out different options for the plaque on the side, as well as the bobbin door for the base. I tried painting some muslin silver, but it came out grey. I tried some silver tape, and it wasn’t bad, but…

A pincushion made in the form of a classic sewing machine, black, with metal plate, a few miniature wooden spools with real thread, on a wooden base. A button stands for the wheel, and pins stand for the needle moving parts; this angle shows the wooden spools, the button 'wheel' with silver tape and the metal plate

In the end, I used metal from a drink can, after sanding the paint off. I kept the silver tape for the wheel, though I may try again with the metal in the next iteration.

A miniature classic black Singer sewing machine, made out of black fabric and stuffed, with a pin for the needle, and some miniature thread spools stuck on the side. A black button serves as the wheel. The whole thing is set on a computer keyboard, covering about four by three keys

Feel free to skip the rest of this post, as it’s mostly very similar images, as I was trying to avoid reflection from the metal and failing.

A pincushion made in the form of a classic sewing machine, black, with metal plate, a few miniature wooden spools with real thread, on a wooden base. A button stands for the wheel, and pins stand for the needle moving parts. The angle shows that silver metallic tape has been added to the button, to look more like the actual machine
A tiny wooden thread spool with a 1in sewing pin through, laying on a metal ruler.
A tiny wooden thread spool with a 1in sewing pin through, laying on a metal ruler.
Black sewing machine pincushion, unstuffed; a small oval of grey fabric stands for the metal plate
Black sewing machine pincushion, stuffed, no base, with an oval "plaque" made of silver metal tape
A pincushion made in the form of a classic sewing machine, black, with metal plate, a few miniature wooden spools with real thread, on a wooden base. A button stands for the wheel, and pins stand for the needle moving parts. The angle shows better the color of the thread in the spools

2 Responses to “Classic sewing machine, of sorts”

  1. willaful 10/08/2022 at 11:52 AM #

    It’s so darling! Thank you a million times!

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