Advice to parents–from a misogynist

6 Aug

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia)

Now for some levity.

Male writer for Slate tweets, “Advice to parents: teach your daughters to say “no” firmly and mean it. Men sense women’s willingness to yield.”¹

Women on twitter: Do you even know how many women are killed by men they said “NO” (firmly and clearly) every year?

Male writer: ‘Actually’ I wasn’t talking about sexual assault, I meant like Maxine Waters exchange with Steven Mnuchin.²

Women: Oh, you mean when she had to repeat 39 times “Reclaiming my time” as he spoke over her; then when she had to ask the MAN with the gavel to explain the rules to Mnuchin after she had just explained them to him, and STILL he didn’t actually answer the question?

Male writer: These women and their “twitter outrage!”³

Continue reading

Round up of links: International Women’s Day

4 Aug

Below the fold are a number of links to different pieces on sexism, which were originally posted to this thread, in the Community section of MyMedia during June and July.

Some of the

Continue reading

The Lawrence Browne Affair, by Cat Sebastian

3 Aug

A number of people I trust have recommended Ms Sebastian’s work; most recently, Keira Soleore (review here) and Bona Caballero (review, in Spanish, here), have talked about this novel.

To virtually no one’s surprise, I already had it, in ye olde digital TBR of gargantuan proportions, so I finally read it.

Caveats: adult language, a couple of graphic sex scenes, and implicit emotional and physical abuse of children.

The Lawrence Browne Affair, by Cat Sebastian

This is the second title in a trilogy, which is something I managed not to internalize somehow. As most of my lovely readers probably know, I tend to be pretty anal retentive about reading series in order, because I like seeing the evolution of different characters through the various books. This novel, however, can stand perfectly well as a stand alone.

Well, except that once you are done, you want to get your hands on the first novel in a hurry.¹

Here, have a back cover blurb:
Continue reading

After Glow, by Jayne Castle

25 Jul

Just over three weeks ago, I finally listened to a book that has been in my shelves for…well, years: After Dark, by Jayne Castle aka Jayne Ann Krentz aka Amanda Quick aka…well, at least a couple more pseudonyms.

And now, I am back, with a review for the second installment of Ms Castle’s Harmony novels! (cue happy noises)

After Glow, by Jayne Castle

As I mentioned in the review of After Dark, this novel is a direct sequel, following the same couple through to their HEA, and resolving a number of questions that were left open after the first book ends.

There is more background on both Lydia and Emmett, as well as some filling in on the history of Harmony since humans first arrived to colonize the planet–and Fuzz, the most adorable dust bunny, continues to be absolutely awesome.

Here’s the blurb:
Continue reading

Some Kind of Hero, by Suzanne Brockmann

23 Jul

I have said before that it’s generally hard for me to give up on authors I’ve stopped loving–though I hope I’ve finally learned my lesson there.

On the other hand, there are some authors I still very much like, but whose writing may have shifted in directions that, quite simply, don’t interest me. This was the case a few years ago with Ms Brockmann’s (then) upcoming series: I felt completely meh about the whole “not too distant future” thing.

Then, a couple of years ago. she wrote the first of what is supposed to be a spinoff series from the Troubleshooters and I was somewhat interested.¹

And then…then, this book was announced, and here we are.

Reader beware: adult language, some violence, graphic sex. If any of these bothers you, skip the book. Hell, skip the whole series.

Some Kind of Hero, by Suzanne Brockmann

While this is the 17th full length novel in the very successful Troubleshooters series, it absolutely stands on its own, giving a new reader a good taste of what Ms Brockmann’s writing voice is like: fast paced, with well drawn, three-dimensional characters, and set in the real world, very much right here, right now.

Neither of the main characters have appeared in any of the previous books in the series. And while a couple of the secondary characters have, the story is structured so that there’s no need for extensive backstory of previous events, and what little there is, is integrated organically into the narrative.

Here’s the blurb:
Continue reading

Something different: true crime podcasts

15 Jul

When I was a wee lass (just shy of turning nine), an older cousin started lending me all of her Agatha Christie novels, one by one.¹ I was already a reader, but this is what made me a fan of mystery. A couple of years later, when she moved away, she gifted me with the books, cementing my love affair with fictional sleuths.

It was perhaps two years after I started reading mystery, that I found my first true crime non-fiction book, An Autumn of Terror: The Crimes and Times of Jack the Ripper, at my father’s house.²

I’ve been interested in real crime, mostly cold cases (both solved and not) since, so when I ‘discovered’ the plethora of real crime podcasts available today, I started listening to a number of them.

Through trial and error, I’ve found a few that I really enjoy, and others that, frankly, annoy the bejesus out of me.

Content warning: I go into some detail about some gruesome stuff below the fold, including crimes against children.

Continue reading

Wild Embrace, by Nalini Singh

5 Jul

Wild Embrace, by Nalini Singh

This is the second all Psy/Changeling anthology, and the first with all new stories. (I reviewed Wild Invitation, the first anthology, here.)

Wild Embrace was released last year, after Allegiance of Honor came out; despite my utter disenchantment with that novel, I had already decided I would read the anthology, so I did at some point later in the year. I wasn’t awed by it, but I remembered enjoying it well enough.

After reading Silver Silence, I decided to re-read and review it, to satisfy my ‘completist’ tendencies.

I probably shouldn’t have done it so soon after, though, because I was hyper aware of all the worst of Ms Singh’s writing tics; none of these stories have aged well for me.

Reader warning: This anthology is part of a long series, so the review by necessity spoils some of the stories that came before. As with the rest of the series, there’s some adult language and explicit sex. Finally, I rant–a hell of a lot–about one of the novellas in this book. Continue reading