Tag Archives: 5.00 out of 10

Silver Silence, by Nalini Singh

28 Jun

Over the years, I’ve stopped being blindly loyal to authors I once adored.

Most often, because there’s some change in the direction of their writing that doesn’t align with my own growth as a reader. Occasionally, I grow increasingly unforgiving of their writing tics, to the point where I cannot longer enjoy the story.

Either way, I tend to continue buying and reading books in a well loved series, because there’s always hope that the magic will happen again.

Or, perhaps, I just don’t know when to quit.¹

Which brings me to the Psy/Changeling series.

Last year, I thought I was done. Finis. The End. Game over.

However.

I was already invested in getting the next four story anthology, which…didn’t suck too terribly.² Add another year of the horrible, terrible, no-good reading slump, that stubborn hope, some amazon reward dollars…and here we are.

Caveat: explicit sex and some adult language in the book; a lot of ranting and spoilers, for both the series and this book, in the review. And I mean a lot–particularly the ranting. Proceed at your own risk.

Silver Silence, by Nalini Singh

This book is the sixteenth full length novel set in the Psy/Changeling universe, but it’s supposed to start a new arc in the overarching storyline of the series. If I understand correctly, the first fourteen books were “The Age of Silence,” the fifteenth book was…whatever it was, and this one starts “The Age of Trinity.”

The cover jacket blurb:
Continue reading

Captive Bride, by Bonnie Dee

6 Apr

Captive BrideI usually enjoy Bonnie Dee’s writing very much, because I’m always sucked into the lives of whatever characters she writes. Which tends to be exactly what I want, and need, from authors.

In this case, I had an extremely strong reaction to the beginning of the story, and it took a good long while before I could get past a particular scene–a scene with no gore, no graphic content, and no violence.

Our minds are strange places, n’est ce pas?

Eventually, I got past that bit, and then…well, I had other issues. Be warned, this is a very rambling and meandering review–more so than usual, that is.

Captive Bride, by Bonnie Dee

This is one of those extremely rare beasts in genre romance: it’s set in the aftermath of the War Between the States, but not in the South or the West (as we think of it–the Rockies or the Plains, or Texas). It’s set in San Francisco, in the late 1870.

Here’s the blurb from the author’s site:

San Francisco, 1870

Huiann arrives in America expecting to be wed to a wealthy businessman. She no sooner disembarks from the ship than she realizes Xie is not looking for a bride: Huiann is worth more to him as a high-end prostitute. Though her fate is better than that of other Chinese women forced into the sex trade, she has no intention of waiting for Xie to sell her virginity to the highest bidder. At the first opportunity, she escapes and disappears into the city.

When a beautiful woman takes refuge in his store, Alan’s life changes forever. He’s spent the last five years trying to forget the horrors of war, and had almost given up hope of finding love. He hires Huiann as his housekeeper, and though they can only communicate through signs and sketches, they quickly form a bond that transcends the need for words.

But Xie is determined to recover his property, and love may not be enough to protect Huiann from his vengeance.

Continue reading

Boots & Badges, by Rachel Lee

22 May

I am late for this month’s TBR Challenge, but the lovely SLWendy is very forgiving, so here’s my contribution, such as it is.

Boots and BadgesBoots & Badges, by Rachel Lee

I grabbed this one from my TBR shelves pretty much on the way out the door and with very little forethought–all I checked was that it fit with this month’s theme (old school: ten years or older).

It does, in spades; Boots & Badges is a one-author anthology published in 1999 by Silhouette. All four of the short stories are part of Ms Lee’s successful Conard County series.

Here’s the (melodramatic and inaccurate) blurb from my print copy:
Continue reading

It’s In His Kiss, by Julia Quinn

18 Mar

It's In His KissThere were a couple of days worth of panic involved, but I managed to find one book that fit the theme for this month’s TBR Challenge.

Apparently I had started this novel at some point in the past–I know this because there was a receipt (the emergency bookmark par excellence) stuck between pages 72 and 73–but for one reason or another I had put it down and misplaced it. As in, shelved it with the rest of the Bridgerton books, which I have read.

It’s a good thing I realized I had not, actually, finished it, for a number of reasons (thou shall not shelve unread books among their already-read brethren, being just one of them).

Without further ado:

It’s In His Kiss, by Julia Quinn

This is the seventh book in the original Bridgerton siblings books. Set in the Regency, the T follows the lives and misadventures of eight siblings. The eldest is the current Viscount, after his father untimely death at the very young age of thirty nine, from an allergic reaction to a bee sting. Named in alphabetical order, we have Anthony, Benedict, Colin, Daphne, Eloise, Francesca, Gregory and Hyacinth.

Clever readers will have noticed that the books are not written following order of birth. Indeed, women at the time were expected to marry shortly after making their debut at age seventeen or eighteen, while the males could remain happily single well into their thirties. Ergo, the first story is Daphne’s, not Anthony’s, and Hyacinth’s comes before Gregory’s.

Here’s the blurb, from my slightly battered print copy:

Continue reading

Christmas Angel, by Jo Beverley

19 Nov

Christmas Angel coverFor SLWendy’s TBR Challenge.

Okay, I admit it, this one is going to be a cheat.

Sort of.

Mostly.

Though I have at least three other Jo Beverley books in the TBR Mountain Range from Hell, I got this one just last week  because it was featured at Dear Author in one of the recent daily deals. Now, I’ve been hearing praise for Ms Beverley’s work for ages and decided to dive into this one, since it’s right there on my phone.

At that point, I wasn’t thinking about the TBR Challenge, but then Wendy reminded us that the review is due this week, and I panicked.

Again.

And this is the result.

Christmas Angel, by Jo Beverley

This is the third installment in The Company of Rogues series, though I found that it stands alone pretty well. There are some references to the previous stories, and a fairly brief explanation as to what the Company is/was for our male protagonist, but nothing overly intrusive.

Here’s the blurb (cribbed from Dear Author):
Continue reading

Tucker, by Juliana Stone

17 Sep

TuckerTucker, by Juliana Stone

Amazing, I’m going to make this month’s SLWendy’s TRB Challenge–even if by the skin of my teeth.

w00t! w00t!

Two things to know before you read this review: first, I met Ms Stone briefly at RWA 2009 in Washington DC. If memory serves, it was also her first RWA, and she had just signed with HarperCollins (which published His Darkest Hunger, first in her Jaguar Warriors series). I have not kept in contact with Ms Stone, and I still have my copy of His Darkest Hunger somewhere in the TBR mountain range of doom.

Second, I won a copy of this book in a giveaway for Jen’s July Monthly Glom over at the Fiction Vixen blog, which is where she recommended it.

Without further ado, the blurb (from the author’s website): Continue reading

Sam’s Creed, by Sarah McCarty

19 Mar

This month’s TBR Challenge theme is catching up with a series. Well, I just had the right book languishing in my humongous TBR mountain range. It’s been nigh on four years since I read and reviewed Caine’s Reckoning, and almost as long has Sam’s Creed been languishing on the shelves, unread.

Sam’s Creed, by Sarah McCarty

The second title in the Hell’s Eight series, Sam’s Creed is set a few months after the events of Caine’s Reckoning. To sum it up, the other seven to Caine’s eighth are following up on every rumor about stolen white women in the territory, looking for Ari Blake, Desi’s twin sister. In the course of this search, Sam pretty much stumbles across his own woman, Isabella Montoya.

A disclaimer, I think, applies here. This is an erotic romance. Not only is there sex in this book, there is quite graphic sex and quite a bit of it, with plenty of graphic language to go along with it. So, if you object to either or these, you may want to refrain from reading the review—let alone the book.

Let me be upfront about the fact that I did not enjoy this novel nearly as much as I did the previous one. Fact is, it was a rather big letdown. However, it is a testament to the appeal of Ms McCarty’s voice that I managed to sail through all 400+ pages of it in three, four sittings, without any major derailments in my reading, despite the things that irked me about the book.

First irritant, the back cover blurb: Continue reading