Tag Archives: 6.75 out of 10

The Book Club Murders, by Leslie Nagel

7 Jan

bookclubmurdersI confess that, despite knowing better, I was attracted to both the cover and the blurb for this cozy mystery, and was happy to get an ARC some time ago. However, what with one thing and another, it took me a while to get to it.

As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve had a really hard time reading anything new to me, for going on two years now. (Pity me.) Therefore, any novel I manage to read all the way through these days feels remarkable in some way, on that basis alone.

As usual, reader beware: there’s a romance alongside the mystery, but there’s no sex on page, and very little ‘objectionable’ language.

The Book Club Murders, by Leslie Nagel

I didn’t know before I started reading the story, but this is Ms Nagel debut release. It is also the first in a series set in Oakwood, OH.

I confess that, after reading a few chapters, I did suspect that this was either a debut, or perhaps a second book, because some of the elements of the story seem to fit rather awkwardly next to each other–such as the romance between our intrepid leading lady, one Charlotte “Charley” Carpenter, and the cop in charge of solving the improbable murders that, apparently out of the blue, are happening in the very quiet community of Oakwood.

Here’s the blurb:

Continue reading

Advertisements

Lords of Passion (Virginia Henley, Kate Pearce, Maggie Robinson)

22 Jan

Lords of Passion anthologyLords of Passion Anthology (Virginia Henley, Kate Pearce and Maggie Robinson)

Back in 2010, RWA National Conference was held in Orlando, and I was lucky enough to be able to attend. It was an exhausting and exhilarating experience, and during those days I met a number of people I had only interacted with online for years. Among them was writer Maggie Robinson (aka Margaret Rowe), who very graciously gave me an ARC of the anthology Lords of Passion, which has stories by her, Kate Pearce and Virginia Henley.

However, with me being a moody and unpredictable reader, the poor thing has languished in the humongous TBR Mountain Range since. Then, when I saw that the theme for January’s TBR review was shorts, this was the book I reached for. Unfortunately, less than twenty pages into the first novella, I was seeing red and couldn’t continue, so I grabbed the Charmed Anthology for that review instead (with less than stellar results—oh well, there are eleven more months to try for a hit).

I did finish the book, though, and now you get to suffer through my impressions of it.

The three stories are “Beauty and the Brute” by Virginia Henley, “How to Seduce a Wife” by Kate Pearce and “Not Quite a Courtesan” by Maggie Robinson. The dreaded blurb:
Continue reading

Colters’ Woman, by Maya Banks

24 Apr

Colters’ Woman, by Maya Banks

So it has taken me years but I finally got around to grabbing a copy of this earlier title of Ms Banks’ (the version in my hands is the extended version, published in 2010—the original publication date is October 2006).

Before the review—or indeed, the blurb—a warning: this is an erotic novel, with very graphic sex scenes. Not only that, but it involves a ménage à quatre. If you are a minor or have problems with sex and unconventional relationships, do everyone a favor and read no further.

So, on to the review.

This is one of those novels that baffle me—or rather, it’s my reaction to them that baffles me. I enjoy reading them and fairly inhale them, yet simultaneously I latch onto things that, were it a different book, could conceivably be deal breakers. I tend to think that it is a matter of author voice *waving to SLWendy* because I can’t find any other explanation.

Let’s start with the back cover blurb: Continue reading

Shotgun Wedding, by Maggie Osborne

17 Aug

Shotgun Wedding by Maggie Osborne

Even though I love Ms Osborne’s Silver Lining (review here), I had not sought out any of her other novels—I’m not exactly sure why. However, Super Librarian Wendy has talked about loving most of what Ms Osborne has written1 and…well, when I saw a copy of Shotgun Wedding at the USB last week, I just couldn’t resist it.

Set in the late 1800s or very early 1900s, the novel details events occurring during the few months between late Spring and early Fall in the small Kansas town of Marshall.

Here’s the back cover blurb: Continue reading

Atlantis Unmasked, by Alyssa Day

21 Jan

In compliance with FTC guidelines, be aware that I bought this book.

*   *   *   *   *

Atlantis Unmasked, by Alyssa Day

The latest entry in Ms Day’s Warriors of Poseidon series, Atlantis Unmasked follows Atlantean warrior Alexios and rebel fighter Grace—who just happens to be a descendant of Diana the Greek goddess. If that seems a bit confusing, it’s because this is one of those series where reading previous installments is pretty much required—between recurring characters and on going story arcs, a newcomer to this universe would scratch her head a number of times while reading this one.

In other words: beware for series spoilage, ye Warriors of Poseidon virgins out there!

(For those readers out there who don’t mind jumping in the middle, you crazy people you, I’ll add a brief primer to the universe after the blurb, as well as linking to my reviews of the previous titles at the end of this one.)

Humdrum back cover blurb ahoy: Continue reading

The Bravo Bachelor, by Christine Rimmer

9 May

The Bravo Bachelor, by Christine Rimmer

 

To my recollection, this is my first novel by Ms Rimmer. Published by Silhouette Special Edition, The Bravo Bachelor is a new installment in a long running series of novels, some more loosely connected than others, about the Bravo family from Texas.

Here’s the back cover blurb: Continue reading

Confessions of a Millionaire’s Mistress, by Robyn Grady

7 Mar

Confessions of a Millionaire’s Mistress, by Robyn Grady

Published in Australia by Harlequin’s Sexy Sensations (and as a Harlequin Presents in North America), Confessions of a Millionaire’s Mistress is pure contemporary romance. There’s no murder, no explosions, no intricate subplot to distract the reader from the development of the relationship between hero and heroine.

It is not without some troubles—first and foremost in the packaging. That title? Nothing whatsoever to do with anything in the novel, as far as I can see. The blurb is not much better: Continue reading