Tag Archives: 8.00 out of 10

Forever Your Earl, by Eva Leigh

18 Jan
A blonde white woman wearing a royal blue gown, her shoulders and back bare, looks back over her shoulder at the reader, holding a masquerade mask with tall pink plumes. The background and overall color palette indicates the interior of a grand British mansion at night.

I have had a signed copy of this book waiting on the TBR for a long time–I think I may have gotten it at RWA 2017, which was held in Orlando that year, but honestly, my memory can’t be trusted on this, it may have been even longer than that. As it’s the first in a series and the first the author wrote under this name, it feels very appropriate for SuperWendy’s January TBR Challenge theme: starting over. (see footnote 1)

Eva Leigh is one of Zoë Archer‘s pseudonyms; like Amanda Quick before her, this author has reinvented herself as inspiration and the market have intersected, generally with great success with readers.

Reader beware: a secondary character suffers from severe PTSD (no episodes on page), explicit sex on page.

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The Christmas Murder Game, by Alexandra Benedict

3 Oct
Cover for The Christmas Murder Game: on a black field, with light grey snowflakes falling, a string of beads zigzags from a star at the top, in ever widening segments, to form the silhouette of a Christmas tree. The ornaments are all white keys in different shapes...except for a poison bottle and a bloody knife.

I was done in by the cover. I mean. Look at the cover. It’s perfect! Then there’s the blurb, with all my catnip in one big serving, and so I ran to NetGalley to ask for an ARC, which I was beyond delighted to get.

And then, the let down.

How was I supposed to know this is told in my dead-least-favorite narrative voice?

So, reader beware: third person present tense narrative voice; PTSD; discussion of a suicide in the past; the main character has prosopagnosia, and one murderously dysfunctional family from hell. Also, several characters are queer (either bisexual or lesbians).

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“The Beast of Blackmoor”, by Milla Vane

3 Jan
Cover of The Beast of Blackmoor showing a bare chested muscular white man wearing a fur cloak, some sort of leather garment from waist to mid-thighs, and vambraces, holding a bladed polearm

I first read this story shortly after it was published as part of the Night Shift 1 paranormal romance anthology, back in late 2014. I was lost in the story from the word go, while well aware that it is set in a very dark world, with violence of every kind and abundant gore, and graphic sex on the page.

Reader, beware.

I finished it wishing for more stories, and I’m very glad they are now available.

(Also worth noting, Milla Vane is a pseudonym for Meljean Brook. 2)

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Dark Desires After Dusk, by Kresley Cole

28 Jul

DarkDesiresAfterDuskIn between attempting to read other things, I’m still re-reading the Immortals After Dark books, so here’s another review for you.

Readers not familiar with the series may want to keep in mind that the world is relentlessly heteronormative; all the pairings involve the ‘fated mate’ trope; plus, there’s quite a bit of cursing and graphic sex, violence and gore.

In this particular installment, the heroine has OCD; I am not overly familiar with this disorder, so I cannot say whether how this is written here is sensitive, informed, accurate, or triggering. (There are spoilers on this in the review.)

Proceed at your own risk.

Dark Desires After Dusk, by Kresley Cole

This is the sixth story in the IAD series, and some of the events in this book overlap what happens in the next title, Kiss of a Demon King. Not coincidentally, these are the stories of The Woede, the two demon brothers introduced in Wicked Deeds on a Winter’s Night.

The heroine, who I find utterly delightful, is entirely new to the series. And, it turns out, to the Lore as well; one Holly Ashwin, PhD candidate and math professor at Tulane U, and, for her sins, this Accession’s most popular girl.

Here, have a blurb (I hate this blurb–what’s new, right?):
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