Tag Archives: 8.00 out of 10

Dark Desires After Dusk, by Kresley Cole

28 Jul

DarkDesiresAfterDuskIn between attempting to read other things, I’m still re-reading the Immortals After Dark books, so here’s another review for you.

Readers not familiar with the series may want to keep in mind that the world is relentlessly heteronormative; all the pairings involve the ‘fated mate’ trope; plus, there’s quite a bit of cursing and graphic sex, violence and gore.

In this particular installment, the heroine has OCD; I am not overly familiar with this disorder, so I cannot say whether how this is written here is sensitive, informed, accurate, or triggering. (There are spoilers on this in the review.)

Proceed at your own risk.

Dark Desires After Dusk, by Kresley Cole

This is the sixth story in the IAD series, and some of the events in this book overlap what happens in the next title, Kiss of a Demon King. Not coincidentally, these are the stories of The Woede, the two demon brothers introduced in Wicked Deeds on a Winter’s Night.

The heroine, who I find utterly delightful, is entirely new to the series. And, it turns out, to the Lore as well; one Holly Ashwin, PhD candidate and math professor at Tulane U, and, for her sins, this Accession’s most popular girl.

Here, have a blurb (I hate this blurb–what’s new, right?):
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In Hope’s Shadow, by Janice Kay Johnson

11 Nov

In Hope's ShadowAmazingly, I have managed to write a review! (I’m afraid to look back, and see how long since the last one–this has not been a good blogging/reading year for me so far)

I got an ARC for this novel a while back (like, over three months ago :wince:). When I realized that it’s the second in the Two Daughters duology, I stopped reading, and one-clicked the first title, Yesterday’s Gone.

After a lot of false starts with other books, and tons of re-reading, I finally grabbed In Hope’s Shadow a couple of days ago–and read it in one sitting.

Hoping that late is still better than never, here’s my review.

A caveat: I definitely recommend reading these two stories in order. A warning: there are references to child abuse, references to animal abuse, and an off-page murder. Reader, beware.

In Hope’s Shadow, by Janice Kay Johnson

The setup for the two novels is this: six year old Hope Lawson is kidnapped, snatched off the playground at school. A few years later, her parents, who have not given up on finding her alive, adopt a little girl her missing daughter’s age. A couple of decades after that, Hope miraculously, unexpectedly, turns up–alive, and willing to reconnect with her parents. And her adoptive sister, Eve.

Here’s the blurb, from amazon:
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Up Close and Dangerous, by Linda Howard

12 Aug

Up Close and DangerousAs I’m still struggling with the reading slump from hell, I’ve turned to old favorite authors for comfort reads. Not only do I re-discover plot points or scenes I had long forgotten, but I’m also finding that many of these books stand up very well to the passage of time. Win-win.

As I’ve said a couple of times before, many of Linda Howard’s books are among my all time favorites (though that is one crowded set of bookcases, lemme tell you). While this one has many of the elements that make her novels so appealing to me, it’s not as successful in a couple of respects.

Up Close and Dangerous, by Linda Howard

This novel had a mixed reception when it was released, back in 2007. Personally, I liked it well enough when I read it for the first time, soon thereafter. Re-reading it now, particularly during a slump, has allowed me to better see the basis for the original criticism.

Here’s the blurb, from the cover jacket of my hardback copy:
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Yesterday’s Gone, by Janice Kay Johnson

10 Aug

YesterdaysGoneThis is Ms Bates’ fault (in the best possible way).

See, last week, she posted this lovely review of Ms Johnson’s To Love a Cop, which reminded me of how much I usually enjoy this author’s work.

So off I went to check, and found out that there’s a new book by her, coming out in October.

Since I’m still struggling to read (reading slumps suck big hairy donkey balls), I asked for, and received, an ARC for In Hope’s Shadow, but when I started to read it, I realized it was connected to a previously released title–Yesterday’s Gone. So, of course, I bought it so I could read in order.

I’m glad I did.

Yesterday’s Gone, by Janice Kay Johnson

This is the first of the Two Daughters duology by Ms Johnson. The premise is this: what happens when a girl, abducted long ago, turns up alive and well, now an adult with a different sense of self? How does someone who has survived isolation, and emotional and physical abuse, cope with familial relationships, memories, love? How does the family who lost that child, who has waited and searched, who has prayed and loved, for so many years, adapts to the reality of this new person?

Here is the blurb:

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“A Wolf to Watch Over Me” by Sela Carsen

25 Jul

A Wolf to Watch Over MeI feel like cheering and doing cartwheels.

I read a story! I read a new-to-me story! In one greedy gulp!

Okay, it’s a short story (amazon tells me it’s only 35 pages long), but here’s the thing: it’s the first thing I have managed to read through since freaking May!

So here’s my (brief) review.

“A Wolf to Watch Over Me” by Sela Carsen

I became aware that Ms Carsen had released a new story after a fairly long hiatus, so of course I headed over to read a sample–and fell right into the story.

Here, have a blurb:
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Tangle of Need, by Nalini Singh

12 May

(My apologies for the scheduling snafu–I had not realized that Ms Croteau’s book was coming out on a Monday, so I had to flip the posts.)

Tangle of Need coverOn the positive side, I’m still on track to catch up on the reviews by June 2nd, release day of Shards of Hope, the fourteenth novel in Nalini Singh’s Psy/Changeling series.

Same warning as last time, for anyone considering starting the series with this book: seriously, don’t do it. You can read pretty much any of the first three, perhaps even the first four books out of order and not miss too much (though a few bits from the previous novels are spoiled if you do that).

But this particular novel depends too much on what has happened in the Psy/Changeling world up to this point. I sincerely believe that anyone coming in cold to the world and jumping in here would have some trouble following several of the story threads, and perhaps grow to dislike the entire premise as a result.

Also, there are some passing spoilers for all the previous books in this long, long review.

Without further ado:

Tangle of Need, by Nalini Singh

This is the eleventh full length novel in the series, and one that I struggle with a bit, for reasons explained below.

The main story line in it revolves around two dominant wolf changelings from the SnowDancer pack.

For readers who don’t re-read and may have forgotten, Adria is Indigo’s aunt and was introduced in Play of Passion. While not as dominant or as high in the hierarchy of the pack as her niece, Adria is dominant enough to have become a senior soldier–basically, one short step down from the lieutenants–almost a year before, at just twenty five.

Riaz, who is also introduced during Play of Passion, is one of the Pack’s ten lieutenants. A lone wolf type, he has just recently returned to the den on a permanent basis, after having spent years acting as business person and pack liaison in different countries of Europe.

The (ugh) blurb, from the author’s site:

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One Night of Scandal, by Elle Kennedy

8 May

One Night of Scandal CoverI am finally getting around to posting my review to the middle book in Ms Kennedy’s After Hours trilogy.

This is, by my reckoning, only the second time I post reviews of series or trilogies out of order, even though I read the books in order.¹ Since I know I was planning on reviewing all three, because I like them all, I can’t for the life of me figure out how I skipped the middle one.

At any rate, here it is.

Usual warning: this is an erotic romance, so there’s plenty of sex written graphically. The adult people depicted speak the way most adult people do–expect curses and other crude language.

One Night of Scandal, by Elle Kennedy

Even though this is the second in a trilogy, I think it can be easily read as a stand alone, as there is enough background information to bring readers up to speed, without a lot of info dumping.

The story centers around one of the three owners of Sin, a fairly popular Boston nightclub, and his crush on one the (now ex) girlfriend of one of his two closest friends. These three guys have been friends for a good long time, and all three fought successfully in the Boston MMA circuit. Long enough and successfully enough to be able to open a high scale nightclub and have it in the black within a few years of opening night.

Here’s the blurb from the author’s website:
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