Tag Archives: anti-Semitism

“Life is really a One Way street, isn’t it?” (At Bertram’s Hotel, Agatha Christie)

11 Feb

completemissmarpleThe title of this post is a line by Miss Jane Marple, that unforgettable prototype of the intelligent, interested, principled, elderly lady sleuth.

Several months ago, the Complete Miss Marple Collection (digital version) was on sale at amazon for a truly ridiculous price–something like $5.99. Being a fan of Dame Christie, I snapped it up (yes, I have all of them in print, and have for at least forty years, but many are in Spanish, and all of them are falling apart at the seams, from age and use).

With one thing and another, I’ve been reading snippets here and there, until a few weeks ago. Feeling a bit sick, I finally fell into one of the stories.

Yay!….?

Well…

Not so much.

See, things that I barely noticed before, or that I was able to shrug off when I did notice, now bother me a great deal, making it difficult for me to fully enjoy these stories that, for so long, were among my favorite reading.

Allow me to explain.

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This is what an exclusionary society looks like.

8 Aug

(This post has been edited to add more links

for further reading as I become aware of them;

there is a second edit to address my inaccurate reporting

of the ending of a book I have not read)

This rant, which has been percolating in my brain and heart since the morning after the Ritas were handed down,¹ is brought to you by the inclusion of the book For Such a Time, by Kate Breslin, into the list of finalists for RWA’s Rita Awards.

Why would that be a problem? you may ask. Well, a couple of reasons, which have been thoroughly discussed in several places, but let us start with a quick summary, shall we?

The novel, set during WWII, is about a blue-eyed, blonde Jewish young woman–described as Jewess in the actual blurb, I kid you not–who is ‘rescued’ from Dachau’s concentration camp by the SS officer in charge of Theresienstadt concentration camp, and how they fall in love. The book ends with the Jewish protagonist’s faith being healed by the Bible (New Testament included), and with the SS officer having been redeemed by the power of (Christian) love.

Chew on that for a second, if you would.

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