Tag Archives: DNF

Take Me For A Ride, by Karen Kendall

19 Oct
In the foreground, a white man in dark slacks and jacket, white shirt, shown from the mouth down, walks towards the camera. Behind him, a blurry car, presumably speeding away. The background is the skyline of a city with many skyscrapers, against a darkening stormy sky.

This month’s SuperWendy’s TBRChallenge theme is “flirting with danger”, which in my world almost always means romantic suspense. As this cover fairly screams “running from the bad guys”, and since this book has been sitting in my print TBR cordillera of doom since RWA in DC (in 2009, mind), it seemed like it was all going to work beautifully.

Unfortunately, it didn’t.

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Christmas Wolf Surprise, by Terry Spear

7 Oct
A handsome, fairly muscular white man with dark hair wearing a longsleeve thermal-type of shirt and jeans; in the background, a small town street with Christmas lights, falling  snow and pine trees, and a worlf walking down the street.

I am trying to do something about the ungodly number of digital ARCs in my TBR, and as this book releases next week, I decided to try a timely review.

Spoiler: it did not go well; I tried, but I gave up at 52%, after skimming the last chapter, to see if there was something there that would make it worth it to continue.

Reader, beware: the world building is not well thought out; there’s sex on the page; and the disregard for informed consent (on becoming a wolf shifter, not sex) is appalling.

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The Unexpected Wife, by Jess Michaels

17 Jan
Cover for The Unexpected Wife; a white heterosexual couple dressed in British Regency-ish clothes, standing together, looking into each other's eyes.

I blame Miz Wendy’s Unusual Historical blogposts for this one (the one for March 2021, specifically.) No sooner had I read the premise, that I had bought the book: three women unknowingly married to the same man, one murdered scoundrel, now what?; then set it in Regency England for good measure, and here I am, ready to go on a ride.

Sadly, life ::cough reading slump cough:: got in the way, and the book languished in the TBR digital cordillera of doom, until now, when I thought it would be an excellent January entry for SuperWendy’s TBR Challenge.

Alas, nothing in the execution worked for me, making this a DNF review.

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The Hating Game, by Sally Thorne

28 May

…or how I DNFed a book most everyone else seemed to love.

The Hating Game, by Sally Thorne

For months, I heard everyone and their pet poodle praise this book, so I snagged it at some point when it was on sale.

I don’t know how it was that I didn’t realize it’s written in first person present tense–which I do not like. As far as I’m concerned, first person is incredibly difficult to do well, and present tense can be gimmicky. I have enjoyed first person present tense before (Ann Aguirre’s Grimspace books, for example), but it’s very rare.

One of the reasons first person is tricky is that it’s harder to read for the other characters, when you don’t connect with the main character.

I also didn’t realize this is the author’s debut until I looked up the blurb; the writing does not read like a first effort.

The first few pages are smooth and engaging, and I felt myself being pulled into the story. Among the pulls is the fact that the story is set is the offices of two ailing publishing houses merged into one, still failing, company.

Blurb:
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