Tag Archives: domestic violence

Round up of links: International Women’s Day

4 Aug

Below the fold are a number of links to different pieces on sexism, which were originally posted to this thread, in the Community section of MyMedia during June and July.

Some of the

Continue reading

Advertisements

Misogyny, domestic violence, mass murder.

22 Jul

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia–added footnote)

(My apologies for the lack of commentary for this link–not up to it, for many reasons¹)

On the relationship between misogyny, domestic violence, and mass murder:

“1 in 4 women expected to be a victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in her lifetime.”

“We raise our boys with an acceptance that violence will be part of their behaviors (’boys will be boys’), while teaching them to repress all feelings except for anger (’boys don’t cry’), in a society which objectifies girls and women,” she explained. “While problematic in and of itself (’patriarchy hurts men too’), we see that abusers overwhelming come from abusive background, and thus only replicate patterns they have learned during their childhoods, patterns which, while criminal, are ultimately reinforced in a number of ways in a masculine culture of violence.”

Source.
Continue reading

Feminism: this is why it is not just needed, but essential

5 Feb

Generally speaking, I don’t watch sports. Particularly speaking, considering what has come out in recent years about NFL’s players behaviour toward women, I don’t watch football at all.

I do tend to watch the Super Bowl ads online (awwwww, Budweiser ads).

This year, this ad stopped me cold:

Continue reading

Talk to your sons, your husbands, your brothers, your fathers…

22 Sep

…but especially, talk to your sons.

When they are still young and flexible enough to appreciate that there is no reason why girls and women should be treated differently than they themselves are treated.

When they are still young enough to understand that they themselves shouldn’t be expected or forced to conform to a stereotype of behaviour that stifles who they are and what they feel.

When they can still learn that there are no gray areas when it comes to assault, violence, degradation of other human beings, based on whether those other human beings have or have not dangly bits, or whether those other human beings declare themselves to be straight, gay, or anything in between or outside of those two.
Continue reading

Why is it so hard to admit that misogyny actually kills people?

27 May

Updated 06/07/17: I have become aware that Ms Green is not only transphobic, but that she is currently dating a white supremacists/Nazi wannabe/’alt-right’ guy. So, while there is a lot of good information and sex positivity in her channel for cisgender individuals, her online presence as a whole, and her current behaviour, speak of deeply held prejudices. “Dime con quién andas, y te diré quién eres” (you can tell who people are, by the company they keep), after all. If you are gender fluid, you probably will want to avoid watching.

This is the question that Laci Green asks at the end of this video:

DISCLAIMER: NSFW, mostly for language, but it also may be offensive for those people who feel sorry for a mass murderer and advise women to be less stuck up–aka, exercise their right to say “no, I won’t date/fuck you”

 

 

Why is it so hard to admit that misogyny actually kills people?

Because we–all of us, women included–would have to accept our own responsibility for the rampant misogyny in western culture. How we react to the behaviour and comments of the men in our own lives–friends, relatives, children. Or, more to the point, how we fail to react, never pointing out to them, and to those watching, that their comments and behaviours are misogynistic, offensive and unacceptable.

Brings tears to my eyes

1 Jun

and reinforces my good opinion of Patrick Stewart.

“The people who could do most to improve the situation of so many

women and children are, in fact…

men.”

How can I like it when it makes me so uncomfortable?

13 Feb

(aka, what is this consistency you speak of?)

The music is bouncy and catchy, and the lyrics are deceptively simple, with the refrain/title repeated so much it’s pretty much all you remember of the song. Then you watch the original video or this jaw dropping, incredibly amazing live performance at the 2012 American Music Awards:

and become extremely uncomfortable about the actual subtext of the song.

While still being amazed at P!nk’s courage, talent and commitment to be true to herself.