Tag Archives: Lisa Kleypas

Dreaming of You, by Lisa Kleypas

16 Jul

DreamingOfYouI’m back with another historical romance from Lisa Kleypas–and not just any one of them.

For a rather large number of romance readers, Derek Craven, the hero of Dreaming of You, is up there with Mr Darcy, as far as favorite romantic heroes go. Ergo, the book shows up often on “top 100” romance lists.

I, however, came late to Ms Kleypas’ books; this book had been out ten years, if not twelve, when I finally read it, and I had read a lot of romance during that time (including a number of Ms Kleypas’ later novels) so my opinion has always been…a tad less enthusiastic than the norm, shall we say.

As usual, reader beware: there’s explicit sex and cursing on the page.

Dreaming of You, by Lisa Kleypas

This is the second book in a duology; Derek Craven, our hero, was introduced as a rather important, and quite intriguing, secondary character in Then Came You, published a year earlier.

Our heroine, Miss Sara Fielding, is a little country mouse who just happens to be a well known novelist, and who is visiting London to research her next opus. And let me tell you, this background for the heroine creates all sorts of problems for me.

Here’s the (as always hated) blurb from my copy:
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Where Dreams Begin, by Lisa Kleypas

12 Jul

WhereDreamsBeginI am feeling very frustrated about my reading right now; even though I’m enjoying the Immortals After Dark quite a bit, I’m having trouble concentrating on any one thing. *cue frustrated scream*

So when someone mentioned this title, I realized that I had not re-read it in a good long while, despite the fact that I like it quite a bit. In fact, I really like many of Ms Kleypas’ historical romances, but I’ve only reviewed two of her books. Which just makes no sense, so here we are.

Reader beware: there is sex on the page.

Where Dreams Begin, by Lisa Kleypas

This is that rare beast, a fully stand alone novel. It also has a widowed heroine who not only loved her husband, but was sexually satisfied by him–this is even rarer in romance. She’s also a lady, a member of the ton, long on manners and pedigree, short on cash. The hero is one of those trade magnates, a nouveau riche who wants to purchase respectability, and acceptance in society, through his fortune. Hijinks, inevitably, ensue.

Here’s the (inaccurate as always) blurb from my paperback copy:
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Mine Till Midnight, by Lisa Kleypas

17 Aug

Mine Till MidnightI’m still indulging in mostly re-reads, as stress is still making my reading mojo waver somewhat.

Trolling through my physical shelves, I pulled this old favorite out, and since a) I enjoyed it very much once again, and b) Ms Kleypas is releasing her first historical romance in five years in October, I thought I’d review it.

However, if you have never read one of her books and if, like me, you prefer to read in order and/or without spoilers, you may want to start with the previous series (the Wallflowers quartet), before you tackle the Hathaways, as we see most of the protagonists of those book show up in this series.

Mind you, the Hathaways is not a spinoff of the Wallflowers, is just a matter of geography. And coincidence.

Or something.

Warning: there’s a fair bit of fetishization/otherization/idealization of Gypsy culture–the ‘noble savage’ thing.¹

Mine Till Midnight, by Lisa Kleypas

This is the first of a series of books about the Hathaway siblings, four sisters and their older brother, Leo Hathaway, the new Viscount Ramsay.

Amelia is the oldest sister, and has taken charge of her siblings for the last several years, since the deaths of her parents. The Hathaways are the children of a country gentleman; much like the Bennett sisters in Pride and Prejudice: long on breeding (if not manners) and short on funds. The title has come to Leo not just recently, but rather unexpectedly, as the family’s tie to even minor gentry is tenuous at best.

Cam Rohan is, as the text takes pains to explain, a rather unusual Gypsy. For more than half his life, he has lived in London, first as a houseboy, and then as general factotum, for Jenner’s, a gambling establishment.

Here’s the (quite godawful) blurb from my paperback copy:
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Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor, by Lisa Kleypas

17 Feb

Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor, by Lisa Kleypas

At just over 200 pages, this is another one of those skinny hardback novels put out by St Martin’s Press during the 2010 holiday season. In all honesty, despite liking most of what I’ve read by Ms Kleypas¹, I wouldn’t have picked this up for myself—$17.00 for a book that’s barely longer than a SuperRomance? erm…nope. Luckily, I didn’t have to—I was one of the lucky recipients of a giveaway held by the lovely Christine (who happens to be one of Lisa’s Divas).

A contemporary romance, this one of those rare beasts with nary a suspense thread nor a psychotic ex or malicious family members working over time to thwart a budding romance. In fact, there’s basically no conflict in the novel.

But I’m getting a bit ahead of myself—here’s the jacket blurb: Continue reading