Tag Archives: Romance

Wherever you go, there you are.

19 Nov

This is one of those things that are self-evident, no? And yet, sometimes we fail to see what’s evident until something forces us to focus on it.

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Why is the romance genre inherently feminist?

2 Feb

(Originally posted to the Community section of MyMedia forum)

Because is written mostly* by women for (mostly*) other women, centering mostly* women’s needs, and pleasure, and joy.

And that, sadly (because women are just over half the human population of the planet, and still the immense majority of stories center on the male experience), it’s inherently feminist.

“Romance reminds us that women want, and it celebrates this fact. How sad that that’s subversive, but it is. Also subversive: the idea of women reading books that are escapist delights instead of “bettering” themselves via the male-adjudicated canon or, honestly, doing housework or tending to their kids. Romance novels are political because of, not despite, the fact that they are usually really fucking fun.”

(source: Who Gets a Happily Ever After)

* mostly and not all, because, you know who has embraced genre romance and the opportunity for positive representation it offers? Minorities, particularly those in the LGBTQIA+ spectrum. Because the idea of joy and love that triumph over the miseries of life is necessary for those to whom the world is already unwelcoming, simply by virtue of being

~ * ~

Please note that the piece linked, at the time I post this, states that Jules Cassidy, from Suzanne Brockmann’s Troubleshooters series, is a SEAL. He’s not; he was written, from his first appearance on, as an out and proud FBI agent. I’ve contacted the author of the piece, and I hope there will be an edit on this at some point. But if not, now you know.

The Mountain Between Us (sort of a movie review)

12 Jan

I first heard about this movie on twitter, a few months ago, when the question of whether it was a romance or not was asked (@mostlybree doing the Lord’s work). Looking up a bit more information, I discovered that it is a film adaptation of the novel of the same name, written by…some dude I had never heard of.¹

Which explained, to me, why I had basically heard nothing about the movie until just a couple of weeks before it came out, when it seemed as if the marketing team suddenly realized that a) Idris Elba fucking sells, b) romance readers will go see romances, and c) a romance starring Idris Elba really fucking sells. Suddenly, all sorts of trailers for the movie, highlighting the romance angle, popped up on twitter and youtube.

Here’s one:

 

The short teaser: there’s weather coming, and a number of airports on both sides of the Rockies are closing ahead of the storm. Both Alex and Ben have pressing reasons to get out of Dodge…erm, Boise. Unable to find a seat in the last commercial flights out, and through a connection of Alex’s, they charter a small plane to get them to Denver, where they may be able to catch connecting flights to the East Coast. Unfortunately, their pilot, Walter (played charmingly by Beau Bridges), suffers a cardiac episode as they approach some of the mountain ridges in their route, and the plane crashes. Stranded during a particularly bad storm, in winter, above the snow line, Alex and Ben have to find a way to survive.

Please note: I’m going to go into some detail on the rest of the plot after the cut, so if you are planning on seeing this movie unspoiled, you may want to avert your eyes, perhaps come back *after* you’ve seen it.

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Calling bullshit on “unconventional HEA”

3 Mar

Some of my readers may remember that, once upon a time, I was addicted to the reader-crack that is the Black Dagger Brotherhood.

Quitting it was a hard slog, and there were relapses, but J. R. Ward finally cured me, when she decided that killing off the heroine, after she and the hero finally declare their feelings for each other, was a ‘daring’ and ‘novel’ way to play the HEA card, and that that death was part of what makes her books–about vampires and other supernatural beings–so ‘realistic.’

:coughchokecough:

That was more than fine with me–she can write whatever the hell she wants, and I can not read it.

What’s the big deal, then?

Well, my problem is with the marketing of that book as genre romance.

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