Tag Archives: SL Wendy

“Tempted” by Molly O’Keefe

18 Feb

TemptedI’m late, I’m late, for a very important date…¹

So this month’s TBR Challenge is ‘series catchup.’

Which is usually embarrassing, because these days there are very few, if any, series I follow, so it’s not easy to be behind on any.

Or it wouldn’t be, if it weren’t for the awful, terrible, no-good, apotheosis of a reading slump of 2015.

Which, looking for the silver lining here, means that this year I did have at least one title in a series languishing in the (digital) TBR pile.

So, yay! (and very much so, because I loved this one!)

(Edited to add: a trigger warning for suicide of a secondary character, on the page.)

“Tempted,” by Molly O’Keefe.

This is the second (and hopefully not the last) in Ms O’Keefe’s Into the Wild series, about sisters Melody and Anne, and their lives in Colorado in the late 1860s. Here, have a blurb:

Denver, 1869

Annie Denoe has fought hard for her independence. She has a new life and new freedom as the assistant to a doctor, and though she risks both propriety and her safety, she is determined to be happy in a life on her own.

Steven Baywood is trying to rebuild his shattered life, even though the ghosts of his harrowing stay in Andersonville prison still haunt him. He craves Annie and her quiet strength, but he can’t give her the love she deserves. When a tragedy changes everything for Annie, can Steven find peace with his past in order to give Annie a future?

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A Morbid Taste for Bones, by Ellis Peters

20 Jan

A Morbid Taste for BonesA few months ago, I don’t remember exactly how or where (though I am pretty sure it was during the many discussions of the puppies and the Hugos), it was brought to my attention that the author of the Brother Cadfael novels was, in fact, a woman.

On impulse, the next time I happened to visit the one remaining used bookstore within fifty miles, I bought over half a dozen of the Cadfael Chronicles, thinking it was about time I read at least one of the books that helped popularize historical mysteries.

Unfortunately, by then I was suffering form the most horrific reading slump known to woman, and so the books have been languishing in the many peaks and ridges of ye olde TBR Cordillera.

Until Saturday.

On Saturday, I grabbed the first title and didn’t let go until I was done.

So here it is, my first TBR Challenge review of 2016.¹

A Morbid Taste for Bones, by Ellis Peters

I am not exactly sure how I had managed to keep myself innocent of all things Brother Cadfael. I mean, I knew that there was a television series, apparently very good, but that was pretty much it.

Now, I’m kicking myself over and over–what. an. idiot! I’ve been, not reading these novels!

Here’s the blurb, from my battered paper copy:
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This is what an exclusionary society looks like.

8 Aug

(This post has been edited to add more links

for further reading as I become aware of them;

there is a second edit to address my inaccurate reporting

of the ending of a book I have not read)

This rant, which has been percolating in my brain and heart since the morning after the Ritas were handed down,¹ is brought to you by the inclusion of the book For Such a Time, by Kate Breslin, into the list of finalists for RWA’s Rita Awards.

Why would that be a problem? you may ask. Well, a couple of reasons, which have been thoroughly discussed in several places, but let us start with a quick summary, shall we?

The novel, set during WWII, is about a blue-eyed, blonde Jewish young woman–described as Jewess in the actual blurb, I kid you not–who is ‘rescued’ from Dachau’s concentration camp by the SS officer in charge of Theresienstadt concentration camp, and how they fall in love. The book ends with the Jewish protagonist’s faith being healed by the Bible (New Testament included), and with the SS officer having been redeemed by the power of (Christian) love.

Chew on that for a second, if you would.

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Libraries: the last bastions of equality

4 Jun

(This was originally posted on June 3rd 2015 to the General Literature Discussion subforum of MyMedia)

In late April, National Geographic posted a photographic essay on the homeless patrons of some of California’s busiest urban libraries. Both the essay and the photographs are wonderful, and illustrative of a truly diverse segment of the population of the United States.

However, it is the comments that really got to me. Well, most of the comments. Such as:
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