Tag Archives: Western

Wolf Haven, by Lindsay McKenna

21 Sep
Cover for Wolf Haven shows a white man wearing a shearling coat, a stetson, and a bit of scruff. In the background, prairie, a barn, and horses at sunset.

This is my entry for SuperWendy’s TBR Challenge this month–the theme is animals, and I’m just going with the title here. (Just kidding; there’s a wildlife refuge thing happening, mostly on the side.)

Reader beware: graphic descriptions of torture and heavy PTSD; glorification of the U.S. military; racism through the “model minority” stereotype for Native Americans and the “hellscape drug narco territory” for Latin America; autistic child as inspiration porn; sex on the page.

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Without Words, by Ellen O’Connell

1 Aug
Cover for WITHOUT WORDS, by Ellen O'Connell. Silhouette of a man on horseback, wearing a cowboy hat, shot from the back. Farther from the viewer, a white woman wearing a vaguely late 1800s gown with a floppy had. The background is open sky with some clouds. Quote: "First the bounty hunter changed her life. Then he stole her heart."

I’d like to blame Whiskey’s review for this one–but the truth is, I bought it back in December 2014. Was it on sale? Probably. Why I bought it? I honestly can’t remember, except that I know that Kristie J is very much a fan of the author (she has reviews both at her blog and on GoodReads), and that Wendy the SuperLibrarian reviewed another title by the author (“both of their families should be shot, dismembered and sent through a hay thresher”. OH.)

Reader, beware: violence, threat of rape, trauma, whorephobia, “blood is thicker than water”; the theme of this novel seems to be that there are a lot of horrible people in the world, and that there are a lot of people who aren’t actively evil, but who are content letting those terrible people do inhumane things to those who can’t defend themselves.

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“Tempted” by Molly O’Keefe

18 Feb

TemptedI’m late, I’m late, for a very important date…¹

So this month’s TBR Challenge is ‘series catchup.’

Which is usually embarrassing, because these days there are very few, if any, series I follow, so it’s not easy to be behind on any.

Or it wouldn’t be, if it weren’t for the awful, terrible, no-good, apotheosis of a reading slump of 2015.

Which, looking for the silver lining here, means that this year I did have at least one title in a series languishing in the (digital) TBR pile.

So, yay! (and very much so, because I loved this one!)

(Edited to add: a trigger warning for suicide of a secondary character, on the page.)

“Tempted,” by Molly O’Keefe.

This is the second (and hopefully not the last) in Ms O’Keefe’s Into the Wild series, about sisters Melody and Anne, and their lives in Colorado in the late 1860s. Here, have a blurb:

Denver, 1869

Annie Denoe has fought hard for her independence. She has a new life and new freedom as the assistant to a doctor, and though she risks both propriety and her safety, she is determined to be happy in a life on her own.

Steven Baywood is trying to rebuild his shattered life, even though the ghosts of his harrowing stay in Andersonville prison still haunt him. He craves Annie and her quiet strength, but he can’t give her the love she deserves. When a tragedy changes everything for Annie, can Steven find peace with his past in order to give Annie a future?

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“Seduced” by Molly O’Keefe

20 Feb

SeducedMs O’Keefe’s work is often recommended and widely praised in the circles of romance blogland that I visit most. And yet, I had never read anything by her.

Not too long ago, I saw mention of this story somewhere (perhaps at Dear Author or SmartBitches sales posts?), and decided to get it.

I’m so very glad I did!

Be aware that there is violence on the page, and a backstory that includes rape, as well as PTSD and on-page suicide.

“Seduced” by Molly O’Keefe

A novella roughly a hundred and fifty pages long, “Seduced” is a historical western. More specifically, is a romance set in the late 1860s in the mountains, near Denver.

I was very impressed with how much emotional impact Ms O’Keefe managed to pack in such a limited word count. It helps that there are only five characters in the story, but still.

The blurb, from the author’s site:
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