Tag Archives: SL Wendy

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales From The Making Of The Princess Bride, by Cary Elwes

8 Feb
Cary Elwes in full Dread Pirate Roberts costume, in a still from the climactic duel between him and Iñigo Montoya at the top of the Cliffs of Insanity. The background has been deleted so it's just off-white, with "As You Wish" in ornate font reminiscent of the 15 and 1600s across the top, and a black banner across the middle with the rest of the title in gold and white letters.

In my original notes for this review, I had written that I got the book because SuperWendy reviewed it, but apparently I dreamed that part. What did happen is that, when I saw the kindle version was on sale in January 2018, I nabbed a copy.

Then there it sat, unread, in the humongous if nebulous digital TBR of doom, until June, when the TBR Challenge theme that year was “comfort read”.

Boy, did I need a comfort read! So I dived in and practically inhaled it, wallowing in all the sweet (and bittersweet) nostalgia it evoked.

After which I still managed to miss posting the review on time; in fact, the original draft was from January 2019, a full half a year later.

However, in the spirit of “better late than never” and “blog fodder!”, here is the finished, and hopefully more coherent, final version.

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The Unexpected Wife, by Jess Michaels

17 Jan
Cover for The Unexpected Wife; a white heterosexual couple dressed in British Regency-ish clothes, standing together, looking into each other's eyes.

I blame Miz Wendy’s Unusual Historical blogposts for this one (the one for March 2021, specifically.) No sooner had I read the premise, that I had bought the book: three women unknowingly married to the same man, one murdered scoundrel, now what?; then set it in Regency England for good measure, and here I am, ready to go on a ride.

Sadly, life ::cough reading slump cough:: got in the way, and the book languished in the TBR digital cordillera of doom, until now, when I thought it would be an excellent January entry for SuperWendy’s TBR Challenge.

Alas, nothing in the execution worked for me, making this a DNF review.

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A Study in Scandal, by Caroline Linden

16 Jan

I am trying to slip this one under the wire, see if I can start the year right.

I got this novella, in print, at RWA National Conference, in July 2017, so it was totally in the humongous, overwhelming, print TBR Cordillera of Doom, and therefore it qualifies wonderfully for SuperWendy’s TBR Challenge 2019, January edition. Yay!

Also, I’m pathetically grateful January’s theme is shorts, because between life and the reading slump from hell, I don’t know I would have even attempted anything longer.

“A Study in Scandal” by Caroline Linden

While this is one of the later stories in the Scandals series, I wasn’t lost, despite not having read any of the other stories.¹ There was a bit of filling in some of the series’ backstory during the first couple of pages, but it was easy enough to follow.

I did have other problems with the story, but we’ll get to that. First, the back cover blurb:
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An Unseen Attraction, by K.J. Charles

21 Jun

I’m cheating just a teensy bit by choosing this a my TBR Challenge review of the month. But hey, the novel was in the digital TBR Cordillera of Doom, so it counts.

While I enjoy Ms Charles’ online presence immensely,¹ and despite having at least three other of her books in the TBR Cordillera of Doom, I had not yet read any of her fiction. Then, our Queen Librarian of the Universe, Wendy the SuperLibrarian, reviewed this book recently, and I was most intrigued.

As it often happens, I discovered that I had already purchased it a few weeks before, and, since I had not only read a whole new-to-me book that week, but actually wrote a semi-decent review, I decided to dive right in.

And yay, I really liked it!

Reader, beware: there’s explicit sex and adult language; there are also references to sexual abuse of a character who is not in the story.

An Unseen Attraction, by K. J. Charles

This is the first book in the Sins of the Cities trilogy, set in Victorian London in 1873. There’s fog. Serious fog.²

Clem manages a lodging-house for skilled artisans in a very diverse neighborhood in London. Rowley, one of his lodgers, is a taxidermist, called a preserver (or stuffer) at the time.

And there they are, two gents going about their business as normal, until things…change.

Here’s the blurb from the author’s site:

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